Pizza dough balls

Classic pizza dough recipe

I’ve gone through many many dough recipes over the years and this is the one I currently find myself using the most. Behold, the canonical pizza dough recipe.

Check out our handy how-to videos below or keep scrolling down for the full recipe!

Makes 5 x 12″ pizzas or 3 x 16″ pizzas.

Ingredients:

  • 500 g (4 cups) Type ’00’ flour  or strong white
  • 300 ml (300 ml / 10.5 oz / 1⅓ cups) water
  • 20 g (1 tbls) olive oil
  • 10 g (2-3 tsp) salt
  • 7g dry yeast (or 15g fresh yeast)

Method:

  1. Bring 1/3 of the water to boil and mix with the rest of the cold water. This brings it to the correct temperature
  2. Whisk in the yeast and then oil
  3. In a separate bowl, sift the flour with salt
  4. Mixing by hand: Pour water on top of the flour and begin mixing with a wooden spoon. Once the dough is starting to form, continue mixing with your hands. Turn the dough onto a slightly floured surface and knead using both hands. Continue kneading for around 10 minutes until the dough is firm and stretchy. Cover the dough with cling wrap and a tea towel and leave in a warm place to prove for 1-2 hours.
    Using a mixer: I use a Kenwood Chef. I’ll turn the machine on 2/6 and start gradually adding water. Once mixed, I’ll time 5-10 minutes on the same setting. Cover the dough with cling wrap and a tea towel and leave in a warm place to prove for 1-2 hours.
  5. Once the dough is proved, divide it into 165g dough balls for the perfect traditional Neapolitan pizza base that cooks in as little as 60 seconds in your Uuni wood-fired oven. Let them rise for a further 20 minutes before stretching.  (If you want to do cold proving  (which we highly recommend) use half the amount of yeast and leave to prove in a fridge for 24-48 hours before dividing into dough balls. Cold proving helps to develop a deep flavour to the dough as it allows the yeast to work with the sugars in the flour for longer. Let the dough return to room temperature before stretching and cooking.)
  6. Once proved it’s time to stretch your dough into pizzas.
    Top tips for stretching dough: Always start with a perfectly rounded dough ball as this helps to keep the shape round when stretching out. On a lightly floured surface, pressing down with floured fingertips, shape the dough into a small, flat disk. Working from the centre, push the dough outward while spreading your fingers, making the disk larger. Pick up the dough. Move your hands along the edges, allowing gravity to pull the dough into a 14-inch circle, oval, or rectangle.

Let us know what you think of this recipe in the comments. There are plenty of different variations to a pizza recipe and we’d love to hear your take on it!

53 thoughts on “Classic pizza dough recipe”

  1. How did you end up to using dry yeast ? How would that amount in the recipe translate to fresh yeast ? Anything else to consider ?

  2. Just out of curiosity, exactly how much dry yeast do you use when doing a cold rise?? you say use a little less than the 6gm for the warm rise….would that be 3g or 4g or 5g??

      1. 36 would be half the amount of yeast the recipe calls for. I think if we should use half the amount of yeast he would have mentioned it, he said a little less, Dont you think 3g is too little?

    1. I routinely use a sourdough starter in all my recipes. There is some conversion that needs to be made to accommodate this.

      In the above recipe you have a hydration ration of 64% (the weight of the flour is 64% of the water ) I use a starter of the same ratio and subtract from the recipe the weight of that starter, in the right ratio. If I use 100g of starter for example, I will deduct 61 g of water and 39 g of flour from the recipe. I do not use yeast but mix the rest of the ingredients, let it sit out until doubled, and then proceed with a cold aging as outlined above.

  3. Trying to convert this to imperial or standard and it is a bit off.
    Anyone have a conversion that works? 2.1 cups of flour and 1.4 cups of water is not that user friendly in my kitchen. You may refer to me as the ignorant chef! but please be kind:)

  4. How long would you be able to store this dough in the fridge for? Or would it best to put it in the freezer if you wanted to make it in advance?

    Thanks

    1. Cold prove it for no more than 48 hours then either use it or freeze it – defrost it in the fridge…

  5. Hi there… Tried this tastes great but it sticks! Sticks so bad can’t transfer to & from Uyuni oven …What am I doing wrong

    1. Hi, I usually add about 1dl/ 60 grams of extra flour to help it get more workable.
      In my opinion I think it should be a tiny bit sticky because I always turn the doughball in flour before stretching it out

  6. Hi, I have personally not tried it yet but I have heard of many other persona who does that. It is just a matter of defrosting it slowly and absolutely not in a microwave oven

    1. not really true, there seems to be a more refined taste with 00 flour. has to do with the gluten.

  7. Hi, it could work but the best is if the flour is high of protein in Sweden they are maintoba cream or special flour ( wheat “vetemjöl special” in swedish) bit firstly check the protein content, it should be around 12g (or more) protein per 100g flour, just regular flour would have about 9 or 10 gram wich is a little less to get a stretchy dough, I would suggest you to take a look in your grocery store and see what you can find. “Protein is number one” 🙂

  8. I replace half of the flour with coarse semolina to make a perfect crispy dough (I love super thin pizza dough).
    Also, using mascarpone on pizza tastes amazing! Especially with wild mushrooms and Parma ham.

  9. Do you have a translation of this recipe in US (English) measurements? I’m not that creative in figuring the 320 ml of water. And what is ’00’ flour?

  10. Hi! Do you have a scale? You know that you could convert 100mm of water to 100 gram also 320ml will be 320 gram
    Tipo 00 is a very fine grated flour wich contains a high amount of protein, it can also take more water than regular flour
    /Malcom

    1. Hi I enjoy gluten free pizza’s, I use 400grams of dove farm self raising flour along with 300ml of creme freshe mix together and add a little water, this benefits from plenty of kneeling to get to to roll out as a smooth base, I get 4 pizza’s from this mix, I roll out to the thickness of a pound coin two options now, either dress and bake straight off, or you can toast the base a little before topping and finishing off, this is great as a flat bread recipe, and garlic bread, thickness is the key.

      Enjoy

    2. I’ve made gluten free pizza in my UUNI. I used Chebe pizza crust mix. (chebe.com) and added an extra egg to the mixture.
      Not the same, of course, as what you get with wheat, but it bakes up nicely and tastes quite good. I’ve served it to others and they haven’t been able to tell it was a gluten free crust… they weren’t pizza connoisseurs like those on this blog though… 😉
      M.

      1. Antimo Caputo gluten-free flour (a combination of rice starch, cornstarch, potato starch, soy flour, and sugar)

  11. What are your reasons for using oil for the dough? I’m a little confused because real Neapolitan pizza dough has no oil in it.

  12. I followed the recipe except I used AP flour. My dough was very sticky so I had to add a significant amount of additional flour to make workable. Did any one else have that experience? I’m cold proving for 2 days so not sure yet how it will turn out.

  13. Hi! The type 00 flour is a much finer flour therefor it will also absorb more water then regular flour, before I found type 00 flour in my store I also had to add much more flour than the recipe with 00 said.

  14. 00 flour is known as Italian Flour

    You can get it (and gluten free flour) from King Arthur Flour

    American flour is all about gluten: Ready for action, headed for the highest rise. Our version of Italian “00” flour is a little more laid back. Lower in protein and mellower, it yields the friendliest, gentlest dough to work with: supple, smooth, and easy to shape.

    The “00” refers to the grind of the flour (this flour is exceptionally fine-textured), and this style is one of our top-selling flours online.

    The resulting baked goods are light, airy, and have a crisp snap to the crust. It’s ideal for pizza, flatbreads, focaccia, and crackers. Try it in delicate pasta recipes like gnocchi and lasagna.

    1. Hi Denise! We don’t have a lot of experience with gluten-free pizza, however, we have collected a few suggestions from the Uuni Community Facebook group. The following brands offer gluten-free bread flour:

      Doves Farm Gluten Free White Bread Flour
      King Arthur Flour
      Shipton Mill (we use their standard 00 flour for a lot of our pizzas!)
      Gluten Free Flour Co
      Jovial Foods

      You can also check out this video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFyyR7mDf1Q of gluten-free pizza being prepared for Uuni.

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